I Can Give You Many Things

Photo by Inna Lesyk from Pexels

I Can Give You Many Things

Flowers made of paper,

penny bubblegum rings,

a Monday morning caper,

the courtesy of kings.

Old newapaper clippings,

walking in the snow,

my last haircut snippings,

a collection of E. A. Poe.

If you want them, take them…

It’s very easy to see

you’re the only item

that’s ever mattered to me!


CopyrightΒ© 2020 by Cheryl Batavia


High School Poem

“I can give You Many Things” is another one of my high school poems remembered out of the blue today. It also has a vintage melody that is only in my head and sounds like it could be straight out of 1900.

“The courtesy of kings,” is an old expression referring to being on time. I assure you, I was always late in high school! I might not have been able to keep that promise. E. A. Poe, of course, is the macabre American Poet, Edgar Allan Poe, a perennial favorite of high school students.

Another necessary disclosure: In 1965, you could buy bubble gum for a penny, but it came with a baseball card, not a ring. To get a prize, possibly a ring, you could buy Crackerjacks, a snack made of popcorn and redskin peanuts and coated with a sugary glaze. What can I say? I liked bubble gum and rings, not baseball cards. Maybe it was poetic license. πŸ™‚

87 Comments

    1. Thank you, Ivor. I am glad you liked the poem. ❀ I think this poem was easy to remember because I had made up a tune to it, just in my own head. This is the third time I have recovered a high school poem from memory recently. They are all on my blog. Unfortunately, I had to dispose of all of my old papers, photo albums, and books because of allergies. I don't know if any other poems will come back to me.

      All the best ❀ Cheryl

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    1. Ha,ha! I know I was pretty smitten and read everything he ever wrote! πŸ™‚ My sister, at the start of the pandemic compared covid19 to Poe’s story, “The Masque of the Red Death.” I thought that was a pretty good analogy. Thank you , Angela for your kind comments. ❀ All the best! Cheryl

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    1. Very amusing comment, Laura! Never heard of “The Man from Uncle” cards. I guess I missed out! So far, I have reconstructed and posted three high school poems from memory. I don’t know if there are any more in the “archives.” !965 was along time ago. ❀ All the best! Cheryl

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  1. This sounds so fresh, its wonderful how beautiful words retain their fragrance forever πŸ’–
    Reminiscent of those wonder years when life’s small knick knacks seemed like bounty of kings and queens, and yet nothing felt too previous to gift to that special one who charmed you.
    You have such a wonderful way with words Cheryl – simple, rhythmic and beautiful. Loved this poem πŸ’–

    In hindsight, I somehow missed reading Edgar Allen Poe, should catch up now!

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    1. Thank you, Deb, for your kind words. 1965 was eons ago! I’m glad you like the poem. The rhyme and rythm patterns are very traditional. I notice that I seldom write something that complex now.

      May I reccomend, “Masque of the Red Death,” a short story by Edgar Allan Poe. My sister called my attention to it at the beginning of the pandemic. I think the parallel is striking! You can probably find it online. It is also a movie made in 1964 with Vincent Price. Good for Halloween.

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      1. 1965 … And I thought Bubble gums started at my time …
        I read it again and I see the poetic license liberally used in “courtesy of kings” (according to your confessions on being on time πŸ™‚ ) and “penny bubblegum rings” – very entertaining read your poem is.
        Have already downloaded “Masque of the Red Death” – my workday is over, now I can read πŸ™‚ thanks for the recommendation Cheryl.

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    1. Thank you, Ujjawal, for sharing your kind thoughts and perspective. ❀ I am so glad you liked my old high school poem. πŸ™‚
      I think the true gift of love is sharing your time, even when you are young and have little of value. All the best! Cheryl

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    1. Michel, what a kind thing to say! ❀ I am so glad you love the poem. Thank you for your kind and informative remarks.

      I googled the quote. It is attributed to Louis XVIII of France, but by the time it went through the German and English translations it had become, "Punctuality is the courtesy of kings." That is the way I learned it in high school. Since it is originally a French quote, your version is, of course, the more authentic one.

      I hope you and your family are safe and well. ❀ Love, Cheryl

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  2. What a nostalgic poem to wake up to Cherly and so many memories so beautifully described in words. I love your poetic liscence of course as it is personalized. You have such a beautiful way with words. Have a wonderful day! ❀️ Cindy

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      1. You are so welcome Cherly and to think I thought I was ahead but I clearly missed yours. I’m trying to do an hour 3 times a day but If I miss one I’m out of sync and missing again. How are you managing it all?
        I LOVE your work and am in awe of your skill! You have a great day as well!!! ❀️ Cindy

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    1. Thank you, Rishika, for sharing your thoughts on my old high school poem. I am glad you like it. Have you read Poe’s short story, “The Masque of the Red Death?” At the beginning of the pandemic, my sister compared covid19 to Poe’s story. It is also a good Halloween story and was made into a 1964 movie with Vincent Price.
      All the best! Cheryl

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      1. Ahh yes! A very apt comparison! Today, the World is that black room with red windows and all of us the guests to the ball. I haven’t watched the movie. I’ll try to find it online tonight. ❀️

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  3. You were talented all the way back in high school! πŸ™‚ Thanks for the trip down memory lane. I loved the tiny paper flowers with the long stems. Or maybe they were real and dried.

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      1. The little flowers I was thinking of were colored purple, blue, red, the size of baby’s breath but single stems rather than branching. My big sister taught me how to make tissue carnations when I was in my single digits. We used Bobbie pins for the stem. It was sort of magical. We also made Christmas trees by folding each page of TV guides. Good memories!

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    1. Hi, Cheryl! From one bubble blower to another, didn’t you just love the sound of popping bubbles? Didn’t you just hate trying to get the stuff off your face? Super Bubble sound great! I think we had Double Bubble. You must be quite a bit younger than I am…most Cheryls are! Thank you for sharing your fun thoughts. I am glad you enjoyed the poem. πŸ™‚ All the best! Cheryl

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  4. Haha! I particularly loved the sharp pop of small, tight bubbles. I had too much long hair to risk the large ones. I am 61 this Summer! Sounds freakishly surreal when I say it put loud. My soul is old but my mind is still idealistic like it was in my teens. I meet so few Cheryls so I am glad to meet you. I followed your blog so am eager to see more of your work! Happy Weekend.

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    1. Cherie, thanks for the follow. Congratulations on reaching 1000 followers. πŸ™‚ Bullying is a very serious issue. After my husband died, my young daughter was followed on her way home from school and teased, “Haha, your father is dead!” Kudos for reaching many people about this important issue. ❀

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      1. You’re so welcome. I’m so sorry to hear that, Cheryl. Teasing someone about the death of a loved-one is a special kind of mean-spirited. It absolutely hurts my heart for you both and makes me furious at the bullies. Know that their behavior says nothing about your daughter and says EVERYTHING about the bullies. It shows their lack of personality.

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    1. Thank you, Hamish, for your kind remarks. ❀ I am glad you like the anecdote after the poem. I feel that poems should be meaningful on their own, but sometimes it is OK to give historical context or related practical information. I am happy that you like the poem and anecdote πŸ™‚ Hope all is well with you!

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